Every Gemstone
Has A Story

There’s more to gemstones than just glitz and glamour. Found deep beneath the earth’s crust, these rare treasures have been admired for centuries. Each one has its own story, it’s own history and chapters that are yet to be told. To this day, people around the world are still delighted by their colorful shine and brilliance.

Alexandrite

“Emerald by day, ruby by night,” this color-changing mineral is scarce. During the 19th century, Russian miners gathered a plethora of green gems from the Ural Mountains. That night, the green stones began to shine red in the light of the campfire. Perplexed, the minors finally came to realize that they had just discovered a mysterious, new gem.

Browse Now

Amber

The burnished sun-orange color of amber forms from fossilized tree sap. Preserves of ancient life are often found within these fiery stones, including insects. Incredible colors aren’t the only shocking attributes of this gem. When rubbed, Amber can produce an electrical charge.

Amethyst

February Birthstone
This purple treasure is considered the most precious quartz mineral and often forms in large, six-sided crystals. Due to its wine-like color, ancient Greeks related it to the god of wine. The word "Amethyst" in Greek means sober. Legend has it that if a person drank from a goblet made entirely of amethyste, they would not become intoxicated.

Browse Now

Ametrine

Ametrine is one of the rarest types of transparent quartz. It combines two gems, purple amethyst and yellow citrine. No two amertrines look the same. This fascinating gem can only be unearthed in the Anahi mine, located in Bolivia.

Browse Now

Aquamarine

March Birthstone
With colors ranging from light turquoise to dark blue, this gem is eternally linked to the ocean and water. It was used by Roman fishermen for good luck, while they caught fish and navigated the sea. This gem is prized for its tranquil color.

Browse Now

Citrine

November Birthstone
The autumn hues of citrine call us back to a crisp fall day. Darker colors are rare, and consequently more valuable. The name of this gem was likely derived from the French word for lemon, “citron.”

Browse Now

Diamond

April Birthstone
Created from merely one element, carbon, the diamond is valued for its colorless purity. It is more than just beautiful, it symbolizes romance and eternal love. Most diamonds are over a billion years old, forming deep within the earth under extreme heat and pressure.

Browse Now

Emerald

May Birthstone
The emerald’s lush green tones have lightened lives since antiquity. The first emerald mines can be dated back to 330 BC in Egypt. Cleopatra adored emeralds, using them as royal adornments. Today, these delicate gems are found in Africa, South America and Central Asia.

Browse Now

Fancy Color Diamond

Only one in every 10,000 diamonds possesses natural color. These rare gems are known as fancy color diamonds. They are purchased almost exclusively for the intensity and distribution of the diamond’s hue.

Browse Now

Garnet

January Birthstone
Garnet is commonly found in bold red shades, but also comes in hues of almost every other color. They were often worn by ancient travelers as a good luck charm to prevent illness. Some garnets look like bright red seeds that you would find inside a pomegranate. The name, derived from the Latin word “Garanatus,” means “seedlike.” Traditionally, it’s given as a gift for a second wedding anniversary known as January’s birthstone.

Browse Now

Iolite

Because of its rich blueish-purple color, iolite acquired its name from the Greek word “ios” - meaning violet. Its trichroic characteristics reveal three colors when observed from different angles. In ancient times, it was a precious gemstone for mariners. While navigating seas, iolite was used similarly to a compass, identifying the sun’s direction on cloudy days.

Browse Now

Jade

Considered the most precious stone by ancient civilizations in China, jade has a rich history. For centuries, it has been a symbol of purity, integrity, immortality and intelligence. This powerful gem is believed to enhance knowledge, pure ideas, and long life.

Browse Now

Lapis Lazuli

Deep blue with an infusion of gold, lapis lazuli shimmers like an arabian night. The stone originates from Afghanistan, but is prized worldwide and used extensively in cosmetics, medicine and other supplies. Many famous Renaissance paintings came to life using lapis lazuli paint.

Browse Now

Moonstone

This calming, pearly stone is highly valued by gem aficionados, monks, spiritualists, and shamans. The billowy blue adularescence is caused by light scattering from an intergrowth of microscopic, alternating layers. The power of this gem has been used for protection, medicine and cleansing. Like the energy of the moon, many are mesmerized by it’s magical facade.

Browse Now

Morganite

Like emeralds and aquamarine, morganite is a variety of the beryl mineral species. The subtle blush tones are caused by trace amounts of manganese in the crystal structure. Heat treatments are known to enhance the vibrancy of the blues.

Browse Now

Opal

October Birthstone
With a spectrum of color, the Romans believed the opal to be the most powerful gem of all. Arrays of silica spheres blaze into a galaxy of flashing hues. The kaleidoscopic effect makes this gem unlike anything else.

Browse Now

Pearl

June Birthstone
Born from oysters, these dewdrops of the sea were first discovered in the Persian Gulf. The natural beauty of the pearl needs no treatment to be revealed. Their lustrous and smooth veneer make pearls a timeless staple.

Browse Now

Peridot

August Birthstone
Peridot is found in volcanic rock, inside meteorites and occasionally as crystals in the mountains of Myanmar and Pakistan. This olive-green gem only forms in one recognizable color. They were often identified as the “gem of the sun” by ancient Egyptians.

Browse Now

Rose Quartz

The pale pink hue of rose quartz offers a feminine essence. Softer than silk, this gemstone can be smoky, cloudy or clearer than spring water. These well-shaped, transparent pink quartz crystals are not easy to find.

Browse Now

Ruby

July Birthstone
Ruby is known as the "Lord of the Gems" because of its rarity and beauty. Derived from the Latin word "ruber,” it simply means red. Like sapphire, Ruby is a variety of corundum and only exists as a true red. The highest quality rubies are said to protect their owners from all kinds of misfortune. Many used to believe that rubies possessed an inner flame that burned for eternity.

Browse Now

Sapphire

September Birthstone
Depending on their trace element content, sapphire comes in all colors except for red. Rare sapphires from Kashmir are intense and velvety blue, just like the flow of the Gange river. This stone's durability, combined with its beauty, makes it the perfect alternative for an engagement ring.

Browse Now

Spinel

Often confused with ruby, spinel is extremely unique in its own right. Ranging from deep tones to light pastels, this gem comes in a striking array of shades. The name is derived from the Greek word for “spark.”

Browse Now

Tanzanite

Tanzanite can only be found in one location, near the base of Mount Kilimanjaro. Glimmering in vibrant violet to lush blue, it’s one of the more popular colored gemstones.

Browse Now

Topaz

November Birthstone
Topaz comes in warm and cold tones, from honey yellow to glacial blue. When polished and faceted, this gem is velvety smooth. Its fiery energy boosts self-esteem and good fortune.

Browse Now

Tourmaline

October Birthstone
Tourmaline’s name comes from the Sinhalese word “turmali,” which means “mixed.” It lives up to its name, with a more powerful combination of colors than any other gemstone.

Browse Now

Turquoise

December Birthstone
The vivid hues of turquoise define the color as we know it. Ranging in tone from robin-egg blue to Tibetan green. The variations in stone’s color intensify from the amounts of copper and aluminum found within the water near its origin point.

Browse Now

Zircon

Occurring in an array of colors, zircon is a crowd-pleasing gem. Colorless zircon is known for its brilliance of multicolored light, sparking firecracker effects. The properties rival the diamond, causing centuries of confusion between the two gems.

Browse Now